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The absolutely LAST thing I have time for tonight is a post…but I feel determined not to let work get on top of me yet again. Especially after meeting Clare H (hello Clare!), a regular reader, in the gym yesterday. I’m thinking: do a post, do a post… And all the best for her daughter C’s move this week to a pump!

ANYWAY. All well here. Some weirdo numbers. Mostly too high. But not thousands. Just a few irritating ones. Pizza dual wave needs changing. Breaded chicken continues to be problematic. And spag bolognese is a pain in the bottom: the normal pasta dual wave is consistently a disaster with this; evidently the fat in the meat slowing things down. So E crashes. Treats hypo. Then hours later goes high.

Argh.

ANYWAY. Another fun one is that using the pump is SO automatic that last night it backfired the opposite way from usual: instead of forgetting to bolus for a meal, E accidentally bolused when he meant to have some free carb (eg without taking insulin to cover the carb content)! Ack. He hadn’t eaten all his meal, so needed to have some free carb to soak up the leftover insulin… Had a cereal bar, and automatically bolused for it. I realised too late, with a kind of weird retrospect, suddenly recalling the buzz from the pump of the dose delivering… an hour after. So in goes TWO boxes of juice (because the extra insulin in the meal still hadn’t been accounted for), and we’re in bed over an hour later than we wanted to be in order to see through this errant dose…

Sigh.

AND — as if life weren’t complicated enough (as ever), Cleo is beginning to pound the floorboards. Which can only mean one thing: the vet was wrong, and the breeder was right — she’s coming into season way before spring.

And Archie is obviously an adolescent. And you know they only want one thing…

Ack.

We’re thinking we’ll put her on the pill for a year or so — what do you think? A bit like when you have babies, it’s hard to stop having kittens…

With that: back to the coal face for me…

 

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Okay, so I changed the evening ratio and the first night it was a DREAM. 6.1 mmols at bed, 4.8 mmols upon waking. Sigh of satisfied (and slightly smug) relief.

Things trot along fine yesterday, then, huh, too high before dinner, 11 mmols. End of dual wave pasta from lunch. E comments that it’s too high even for the end of a dual wave and that he thinks the changed dinner ratio will just make things worse. He wants to override the pump and give more insulin.

I resist. More than one day testing is our motto, and we just can’t tell how things are going to go.

So he was right (again). At bed he is 16 mmols. ARGH. Correct and test another hour later. 14 mmols. The pump will not correct again… and this morning he’s still too high, 10 mmols. Another argh. We correct, and when he gets up for breakfast, he’s fine, 7.3 mmols.

Then he forgets to take insulin for breakfast (SO easy to do). Which of course we don’t realise until testing for lunch, three hours later. When he discovers he’s 18 mmols. Triple that argh. We correct and put him on 200% (basal/background insulin). He’s massively apologetic, cross at himself. We also make the decision that he’s going to eat with us rather than put his food in the oven where it will become even crispier than it already is (remember, I’m ‘cooking’). This of course means that him coming down will take MUCH longer… more food going in means more for the body to deal with…

He does comfort himself/me though by mentioning that at least he won’t get ketones, because there is a LOAD of insulin running around his body by now…

Nothing like searching for the half full bit of the glass! Bless him.

It is stupidly easy to forget to bolus for a meal or snack. Reason being: when weighing, measuring, calculating become second nature, then it’s just a momentary lapse that results in skipping the final step — and because it’s such force of habit doing all this, you don’t even remember you’ve forgotten, if that makes sense. Until you stumble across it.

So now it’s three hours and three blood tests later and he’s 12 mmols. On the way down.

The next unknown will be dinner and its ratio: what will happen tonight?!

***
R home tomorrow. I confess I’m now getting a bit tired, hazy with what needs doing. Along with all of the usual kid organising, shopping, meals, laundry, my work (what work?!), cats, guinea pigs, homework etc, there is as ever all the diabetes kit to keep track of: managed to order and go pick up strips and lancets four days later…only the manufacturer seems to be having problems with the strips and they are nowhere to be found…Hmmm…So I have to remember (again, and maybe even again if they don’t have them) to phone or go in and track down the strips. (And prepare the ground with E in case the chemist doesn’t get them in: we have a supply of sorts for another sort of meter, but old habits really do die hard.) Also managed to check insulin supplies — today — and find that we only have one vial left. So ordered those too. And ordered glugogel, because although we’ve never used it, I suspect that having some in-date is a good idea! We are lucky to have a really convenient and helpful chemist, right in our grocery store. They keep track of everything and request repeats from our doctor, which saves me a step… But even they did look at me a bit like why are you placing three orders here over several days when if you’d had your mind even half together you would have done it all at once last week?

Oh well.

The good news is that Archie and Schubert are pretty much best buds now. Cleo however still has this odd love/hate thing going with Archie, and will walk right up to him, hiss in his face, bat him, then run away. And he’s just standing there minding his own business! Then he might run after her, and she runs and hisses and makes a huge fuss…but actually seems to be almost playing…? I don’t know. Neuroses clearly infect even our pets in this household!

Here is the delicious Archimedes, in any case…

Is it very bad if I take this one chance in two weeks to post – seeing as I’m sequestered in a Starbuck’s waiting for straggling students. Straggling and bedraggled as it turns out, in the light rain.

We are in town ‘doing’ some psychogeography – a walk following an algorithm. But it’s wet, alas.

So. News in brief:

1) E again running high in the mornings. Growth. Herewith ends our 2 week stretch of unbroken nights. We must get up and test to try to ascertain at what point he is rising…

2) but not react too aggressively because from Sunday he is away in Wales for a week, no running water, no electricity. Snowdon to climb. Heart attacks to give his parents. He will set running a little high (but not too or he will feel rough and be low energy) the whole time. Hence we go easy on the night levels. For now.

3) this trip should be fine. Should be great. Everyone is prepared. My motherly concern is that he not feel too alone in having to deal and make so many hour by hour by minute judgements in the no doubt changing and out of routine environment. We shall see. Gulp.

4) term has started for me. Hence the headless chicken thing. I think I will come up for air around early November. Alas again.

5) it’s raining. I said that, didn’t I?

6) the KITTENS are spectacular. Like popcorn. Heads held quizzically. Napping in the most awkward positions (sliding down sofa arm, in someone’s crossed ankles). Photos. Will add vid when I get home.


They are now of course escape artists so are underfoot all over the house. And unbelievably lovely. What an experience. And mama Cleo has just been so happy, calling them, checking on them, grooming them. Even though they are weaning. So salutary really….

7) we went to Cornwall for a flying visit – very gorgeous. St Ives Tate, surf beach, and the Eden Project. (sorry, will imbed links at home!) Glorious weather and a special gift of a time, just before we go blinkered for three months…


— Posting on the move, tiny screen!

I’m willing to accept that there may be such a thing as being too alert to your cat. So let me state that right off.

However, the last few days with Cleo and the kittens have been utterly fascinating, and make me realise (all over again) how all animals have to negotiate — whether instinctively or deliberately — the development and independence of their offspring. How we may think one thing, but encourage another. How we may wave goodbye and then burst into tears. Etc.

Here’s the thing: two nights ago I was up for four hours trying to settle the kittens with Cleo. She had suddenly taken it into her head that they needed moving. They weren’t safe. Perhaps it was simply that the other basket was too small — which it was. They were like sardines in there.

Anyway, that evening I twice came to the door of the playroom to find her next to a baby with a wet scruff. I deduced (!) that she was trying to move them, and if the scratching UNDER our bed earlier had been anything to go by, she was planning to take them there, where they could not be even slightly contained… Sigh. So I shut the door. At 4am she would not be quiet. She called and called and called and called. She got out and ate. Came back and called. Searched and searched for someplace to put them.

Sigh. I was struck by an idea. I righted a box we had in the room, put a blue blanket in it, and moved the kittens in. I know she likes the blanket. The kittens were HUNGRY. She climbed in and fed. Phew, I thought. Went back to bed. 5am.

Within the hour she was crying again, clearly trying to tell me something. She was out of the box. She didn’t like it. She kept looking from the kittens to me and back again, like do something!

I had another idea. It was an open box, though a table ran along 2 feet above it. I knew, for some reason, that she wanted more privacy. So I took another fleece, and pegged it to the table (under the guinea pig cage, mind you…stay with me), and draped it like a tent around the box.

Hmm….she checked it out. She quite liked it. She purred. She climbed in. And the deed was done.

Now, what’s been interesting from this is that the move to the bigger box meant that for another day the kittens didn’t venture out. They had more room, and maybe didn’t need to. They kind of poked their heads out of the end, then most of the time Cleo would make noises and literally yank them back: your bottom needs cleaning. Etc.

She wasn’t ready for them to go. And they probably weren’t quite ready to go.

Because last evening and today, she’s done something completely different. She has gone into the room and called them OUT of the box. It’s hysterical. Their little heads poke out and they fight to get out of the box, getting stuck, and they tumble around her. She bats them a bit, bites their ears, lets them suckle a little. They stagger about quite happily and explore. After a few minutes, she stands up and walks into the box. And gradually they follow her in, and everyone settles down.

It’s so simple. She knew what was best. She really did. She knew that if she had someplace different for them, they wouldn’t keep wandering out of the box and getting a bit lost before she thought they were ready. She knew when they were strong enough, and encouraged them to get going, to play.

Wow. When the children were little, I always made decisions about ‘what next’ based on what I would call my gut instinct. But I didn’t know that it probably really is instinct, in the flesh. It’s a real, palpable and despite our evolution, necessary thing which pushes us forward, helps development and survival. At each turn — sending my eight year old to get a cup of water from the counter, sending my eleven year old up the hill to buy some bread… or even standing in front of our one year old (we’ve all done it!) holding out our arms (that’s right, walk to mummy) — at each turn, something could go horribly wrong. You dream about everything that could go wrong. Like I’ve seen in Cleo’s eyes — they’ve gone too far! make them come back! But you know it’s your job to say hey come out here. The world is good. The world is full of new things. There’s a bit of it that might be dangerous, yes, and sometimes stuff happens. Don’t I just know that stuff happens. Better to learn to walk and run and play.

Almost three days old!

I’m pretty sure that photos of newborns of any species are beautiful pretty much in the eye of the proud grand/parent, but here we are! I snuck in and snapped this first thing this morning, when mama Cleo had popped out to have breakfast and do her usual cruise around the house looking for a singularly inappropriate place to move the babies… Scale-wise, each baby is about 100 grams at the moment, with one slightly larger, at 120g. This one is also the only definite BOY. We *think* we have one boy and three girls. They have increased their weights evenly by about 12% in 24 hours. That’s some growing…

I’ve just stuck my head in. Lots of feeding noises, lots of bickering — I want this spot, no I want this spot! — with mama purring away and resting her head on the backside of one of them. Aww!

She’s very happy. And I’m very happy, because at last this morning she managed to do all of her litter tray ‘business’. Number 1s, as they say, were fine from the start, but I was just getting to the point of trying to investigate mild kitty laxatives, when aha! Done deal. All looked healthy and good. Phew.

My only remaining anxiety (well aside from the larger ‘what is life’ ones and the longer term ‘will all the kittens be okay’ ones) is WHY she won’t drink the water in her room?She has two little bowls, both of which she has drunk out of in other parts of the house, both of which I’ve shown her and dabbed on her nose… But still, she rushes downstairs like a bat out of hell when we let her out to drink from the one on the side of the bath. I mean, I ask you!

I remember what it’s like to breastfeed. You are THIRSTY. Silly girl.

***

And last night I finally had some sleep that wasn’t fraught with worry. I didn’t jerk awake thinking the kittens were squashed, and E’s 3 am number was okay, as was his morning one. Hurray! Perhaps we will not set the alarm tonight? Nah. Too soon. But we may be getting there, for a short time anyway.

Deep cleansing breath.

All well with the new additions: four healthy seeming, good feeding and content looking sort of white kitties. Cleo continues to languish in her box, kneading the air — which is called bicycling, and is a very good sign that she’s lactating and happy. She’s certainly purring a lot!

Last night and twice this morning she asked to come out of the room. She proceeded to eat loads of Schubert’s food, drink from the bathtub as of yore (remember, she has all her own food and water in her room!), and explore the WHOLE house. She keeps checking out her old possible nests, and at one point found a few more: under the sofa, under the bathroom cupboard… Right.

Absolutely NO WAY, is all I have to say to that. We can’t keep those babies safe in another situation. They will set off across the room again. Schubert will think one is a toy. It’ll be awful.

I’m only just beginning to stop feeling faintly ill from constant anxiety. Stay where you are Cleo, in a nice, furry cat basket, lovely and warm and quiet. You really don’t want to move them to the middle of all the action. You really, really don’t.

I’m also getting over my anxiety about her adventures away from her babies. She leaves them while content and wanders about the house, for 20 minutes sometimes. Although as I type she’s been snoozing with them (who can blame her, after what she’s been through) for six hours. But when she wanders, I fight panic. I’m afraid she’s going to forget about them. I know that’s silly.

I’m silly. She now knows what she’s doing. And they are stronger every hour.

I remember a dream I once had about forgetting newborn kittens in a cupboard in our old house. I looked and looked for them, and never found them. When I woke up, I was devastated. I had this dream years ago, around the time I lost a pregnancy.

Strangely, I think it’s that feeling which has partly come back. Combined with the panic of having an actual newborn baby human: like if you forget about them for a minute, they will come to harm.

Not true, of course. Funny how I have to learn that all over again.

***

In the land of type 1 diabetes, we are still struggling with night numbers in particular. Having lowered the basals, things once again went a little high last night. The thing is: we are dealing with a moving target. Diabetes never stands still, not in adolescents, anyway. What may have worked two days ago has no guarantee of working today. At the moment anyway. We can only keep pitching the balls, and hope to at least stay in the ballpark….

And I forgot to say in yesterday’s entry that roughly two hours into Cleo’s labour E came in and said that just to add to the stress he had just figured out he’d forgotten to bolus (take insulin) for lunch. Which was rice, a seven hour dual wave (dripping in of insulin). Which explained why he was 23mmols and feeling grim.

Sigh. No one’s fault. It’s so easy to do in all the fuss. But it took him three hours to come close to back in range, 11mmols. And then of course by 11pm he was too low.

Sigh again. He handled it well and didn’t complain, even though I know for an hour he thought he was going to throw up.

And during that time, two more kittens were born.

As I type this, we have FOUR squirming, squeaky, kittens in our…wait for it…playroom. Which translates to the messiest, most precarious room in the house. Sigh.

What an experience. I think we can safely say never again. Though I suppose like so many things, the stress may pass and we’ll think, hey, a nice idea…

So she ends up under a table which is less than 18 inches wide, hemmed in both sides, and with a table stretcher, eg great chunk of wood, right in the middle of it, four inches off the floor. Charming. On carpet. Charming. She went into labour effortlessly, then within 30 mins, with all of us in there, we heard a squeak, and No 1 appeared. Astonishing. She knew what to do and all well. No 2 was a long time coming, and when it arrived, we could see why. Hard to discern exactly, in the dark corner, but didn’t come out the same, was unusually large, and stillborn.

A huge shock, esp for the children. Cleo seemed to know this one was not right, and had paid no attention. To the point where it was still connected. So OH performed the cord surgery, stuffing his broad shoulders under this 18 inch space… Lordy. (All with surgical gloves, of course.)

No 2 had been very messy, so from here on out you may want to avert your eyes. No 3 arrived quite soon after, but she seemed to have little awareness of it. It was quiet and the sac on. I reached in; it was warm and moving, so I broke the sac, at which point the noise and squirming tuned her in. She managed this cord. No 4 arrived quite soon after, yelling his/her head off before even out completely. She also didn’t seem to click with this one, but we left well enough alone for a while as it was squirming and I think even managing to feed, still connected! However, after another 15 mins or so it still wasn’t disconnected, so it was my turn to go in with thread and scissors. A slippery affair. As soon as this one was freed up, however, all three lined up for a drink and Cleo had a rest. We thought that was it, and brought her some food, which she ate ravenously without even standing up.

We went downstairs and poured some wine and opened some crisps. I was wobbly from stress!

After a half an hour I went up again — just in time to see another emerging. Again, this sac was still mostly on, though I could see lots of wiggling, and as I watched, I saw it snorting and taking breaths. Again, she seemed quite oblivious and this one was still connected. Again however we left her to it. When we came back 20 minutes later, this last one was indeed still connected. Out came the thread and scissors again. Me again.

Imagine the stuffing of my whole upper half into this tiny, dark space, torchlight, fiddling with a minute cord and thread. In gloves.

We tried to keep track of placentas (placentae?!), and things seem okay.

Of course, the plus here is that we were up in the middle of the night ANYWAY, so I checked on her then. She was smashed into the corner, purring. I could see some babies but god knows how many, and left her to it.

This morning she was crying to come out of the room, and when we opened the door, she shot downstairs and snarfed fresh food, saw Schubert, asked for lots of love, and returned to her nest.

The four babies were huddled together, all fine and less like drowned rats. Her backside was considerably cleaner.

The saga doesn’t end here though, because she seemed to be prowling around the room. It’s true she’d chosen perhaps the most awkward space in the house…

Later we came in and saw two babies setting off across the room… Not good. Cleo a bit manic. Called the breeder, who recommended moving them into a box and settling her in with them…

Easier said than done of course. Seeing as this mama cat just will not do what we want.

Set up a box, covered it with material, moved the kittens in quickly and then tried to entice mama in. No way. Finally picked her up bodily. She settled down, they squeaked, I left.

An hour later she was sitting in the OTHER covered cat basket we’d brought in, happily cleaning and purring. The kittens were in a pile in the original box.

We got her fresh food, she ate, and needed LOADS of love. Sniffed the kittens’ box, got back into hers. Meowed.

We tried not to panic. Left her to it.

A few minutes later she’s calling again. I go in. She loves me, loves me SO much she’s rubbing against everything in sight. Goes to the kitten box, goes to her box, eats a bit. Rolls on her back. I LOVE YOU, she says.

Right. I love her back, then leave.

A few minutes later, she calls again. I go in. She is still loving me like mad. I pick her up again and try to get her to sit down with the kittens. She does so briefly, licks one, and then bolts out, straight into her box.

Okay, fine. I decide to move them again. This time however I don’t have to touch them with gloves, but can gather them all up on one towel. I pick them up like a little parcel, and lay them in the box with her. They immediately begin to make their way to her, meeping away… And within a few minutes, I can see that she has one leg up , and is letting them feed.

No idea if they are suffocating under the towel, which I didn’t unfold all the way because I didn’t want to fuss. No idea if this will last. But at least they are warm for a while and have had a meal…

LORDY!

The stress!

***

I think there’s a good chance that such highly bred cats are a bit high maintenance. The breeder was unsurprised that Cleo seemed more interested in cleaning her fur than cleaning the kittens at birth. She said Birmans are like this. Now everyone is fine, but at the time it’s like, help them, help them silly mama!

And I was awake much of the night worrying myself stupid. Of course.

***

We are getting kitten formula in just in case. Though I think things are better for the moment.

Lordy. Again.

As soon as I can, I will take pictures!

Over and out…

1) no kittens yet, though prowling mama won’t settle and then sleeps for hours. I’m off out this morning to get rubber gloves (eek) and antiseptic. Just in case.

2) E’s nighttime numbers have been CRAZY. First we up the basal, then we lower it, then god knows…. Not meeting with much settled success at the moment. Messed up my alarm last night and didn’t wake til 4am. Tested and he was 2mmols. Mega ugh. CHILDREN DO NOT WAKE WHEN HYPO.  All this when having been 7mmols the night before, and 14mmols the night before that. Sigh.

3) we have not had an unbroken night’s sleep since about 20 July. Feeling quite used to it, but if we can’t get on top of this in some form before school starts, we will be dishcloths. I cannot help but feel that being in our late forties has something to do with this…Not built for it anymore. (Sorry, OH!)

4) AND Schubert disappeared for 12 hours yesterday. Scared us silly. Last thing we need is a runaway cat. Would rather trade in the kittens than that! He is now zonked out, not even rising for breakfast…

Over and out… And around and around…

Right well still no kittens, but certainly some ODD behaviour:

1) flat out stretched cat. Poor Cleo too uncomfortable to lie long on either side, sniff, so is lying with her front legs right out in front, chin on them, and back legs hunched up. Quite calm. The general consensus is that she probably has 3 or 4 babes in there, as we can see them moving (many more and apparently they are too squished to see move!).

2) a whole morning of prowling for nests and scratching in corners. Thank goodness we filled up the small square at the very back of the spare room double bed, otherwise that’s where she would now be I’m sure… She has now checked out and settled for a time in the bottom of OH’s wardrobe, in the bottom of my wardrobe, in the bottom of E’s wardrobe, and in the far corner of M’s playroom under a table. Sigh.

3) There is one creature who just LOVES to scratch the newspaper in the bottom of OH’s wardrobe, and spent much of yesterday there: Cleo’s brother Schubert. Argh! Right place, wrong cat. When I caught him in there, he looked at me like nobody here but  us chickens (aka the fox in the chicken coop, the thief hiding in the chicken coop etc)…

***

Obviously, birth now getting closer. Not today I reckon though. She’s had breakfast and lunch!

And a story that made me laugh: this morning as usual I got up and went downstairs to the loo. Cleo was in there too, in her litter tray. She scratched. I did my business. Meanwhile M woke up and headed down the stairs. I flushed the toilet, and then Cleo walked out of the loo.

M came into the bathroom, giggling. She said that she might be just half asleep, but had Cleo just used the toilet?!

Ah well. Every little bit helps.

Upon arriving home, we knew for sure that Cleo was expecting. She is round. Eating like a horse. And there are kittens in there! Moving around like crazy.

She is due sometime after 21 August (three days). We are in a bit of a lather.

First time grandmother, I have taken to it with typical obsession. She has not one, but three firm ‘nest’ alternatives now. Which have been alternately lined with towels, fleece and now finally newspaper in the last week. She has not so far chosen any of them. I pray her eventual stopping place will not be a) under a double bed or b) on a window sill, which to be honest has been her favoured place these last ten days. A windowsill! Imagine this. Or not.

Establishing nests for her also seems to have led me into my own nest building: I have been (again rather obsessively) clearing out cupboards and wardrobes. It’s a case of serious overdrive. You could be forgiven for thinking we were getting ready to either move or adopt a child. We have so far filled about ten black bags with STUFF. Only two more sets of clothes and two more chests of drawers to go, and then we will have been through all storage items in the house. Preparing for babies, moi?!

OH says that daughter M would do best to be at some distance when she falls pregnant (one hopes, years from now!). I think he may be right. Meanwhile, I am trying to catch languishing Cleo long enough to trim around her teats (yes, she says defensively, this is actually done, we are informed by the breeder!) so that the kittens (kittens! kittens!) can find their milk…

Sigh.

Cleo looking altogether more relaxed than I feel!

***

On other fronts, we did have an absolutely wonderful time: we read and swam, read and swam. But also saw a number of deep South of France cities we hadn’t before: Avignon, Orange, Arles. Of these, Arles was stupendous. The kind of working, ancient town — with a few Roman remains thrown in — that you’d just like to get inside of. This is what I love about imbedded history: yes, there are tickets to buy and audio books to listen to. Yes there are tourists. Of a sort. But the life of the city just carries on around it. People drive around the Roman amphitheatre, walk through it on the way to work. It’s incredible. And heartening. We also went back to Uzes and the Pont du Gard, two favourite spots which lived up to our memories of them. Stunning, Provencal, and somehow liberating.

ANYWAY.

Number wise things were just fabulous: after the first couple of days of temp basals, E’s insulin levels seemed to settle rather miraculously. We began not to put him on any temps, he hardly had any lows, played in the pool a great deal, walked a great deal… And, you guessed it, GREW like a beanpole. By the end of the holiday we realised his needs had gone up overall, which is why all the exercise etc had not sent him crashing over and over.

And you guessed it: on the way back in the car, his numbers began to soar. Where they stayed, enduring the battle of the 200% temp plus corrections, for about 4 days. Like a plant, with a little sun and water, he had shot up. Had he been less active, we would have had to increase his insulin by about 30%. As it was, we had to do it when we got back.

We figure he grew about an inch in that two weeks. No kidding. He came downstairs the morning after our return saying his eyes were at a different level in the mirror! My lord!

No wonder we have been running to keep up.

So OH and I have not had an unbroken night in four weeks now. We are still trying to get night basals right — he keeps being 12-14 mmols at 2 or 3 am, which is sort of incredible. We then correct him and he’s usually (but not always) okay in the morning. Clearly he’s doing all his growing at night! This morning he was 2.9mmols however, too low, so it’s just that middle of the night window that needs looking at again. We’ve already raised it by two increments since our return.

Oh well. We will get there. Until something else changes.

We’ve also had to change his insulin sensitivity on the pump, or his correction ratio (eg how many mmols can one unit of insulin be expected to lower him?). It used to be 1 unit insulin to 4 mmols in the daytime (high, but he’s quite sensitive), and 1 unit to 5 mmols in the nighttime. For the first four days back at home, we kept finding corrections less effective, lowering him only a little. After setting the basals on 110-120% temp all day and night, and still corrections were not doing it, we figured it wasn’t just a question of basal adjustment. We therefore changed his correction ratio to 1:3mmols for the day, and 1:4mmols for the night. The nighttime one still seems hit and miss (eg didn’t bring him down from bedtime to 2am, and brought him down too much this morning) — but we’ll have to tackle this again through basal rates, as I say…

Endless.

But he’s  three inches taller than me now. Since Christmas. He looks like a tall person in a queue of people. He is beginning to measure up to his father. Which is some good growing, type 1 diabetes aside. Yay!

***

And I haven’t even mentioned daughter M. Who grew like a plant as well, and was the only one in the family who turned the colour of a nut effortlessly and has French style, with scarves and tank tops and gladiator sandals and sunglasses, like nothing I’ve ever seen. Who is only now four inches shorter than me. Who will pass me in height in oh, two years or less. And I will be the short, comparatively squat one in the family. It’s alarming. Really wild. I always thought I was tall. 5’7″ is pretty tall for a woman. Isn’t it? Isn’t it?!

But I’m surrounded by lean, soaring, willowy folks. Of whom I’m so proud. Sniff.

Cleo, E and M. Must be something in the water.

Setting sail

In November 2008 my 12 year old son was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. The effect of this event on me -- and on our nuclear family -- was like being thrown overboard and watching the ship leave.

'Dealing with type 1' in the family has morphed into another sort of 'dealing' -- a wholesale resituating of parenting, of family dynamics...of life.

At my son's diagnosis I could not to locate a record of what living with a type 1 child in the family is like. I could not see myself or our family anywhere. I longed for a starting point, a resource and a sense of the future. Being a writer, my instinct is to write it. This space, I hope, is a start.

Blood Sugar Ranges (UK)

<4 mmols = low or hypo, life-threatening if untreated
4-8 mmols = within target range
8-13 mmols = high but not usually dangerous
14+ mmols = very high, or hyper, life-threatening if untreated

Bubbles

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Distance Travelled

Disclaimer

I am not a medical professional. Any view expressed here is my opinion, gleaned from experience, anecdote or available research.