If you haven’t explored the Urban Dictionary, you might want to think about doing so. I say might, because if you do, you also have to be prepared to run across some shall we say colourful definitions. All the words are input and defined over time by readers….so some of them are decidedly wacky, and many of them are not fit for under 16s.

However. Having a 14 year old in the house does mean that these totally unheard of words enter common usage. Hench is one of them, and one of my favourites. For anyone who doesn’t click through to the dictionary, it means large, muscular, fit. As is the way with slang words, it’s also used with this kind of smart boy self consciousness. And it really does make me laugh. As in:

1) from OH: I’m going to go to the gym now, and get hench.

2) from E, while watching the World Cup, about the players in turn: hey Mum, is he hench? Well is he hench? How about him then?

3) from M, about our large fluffy white cat Schubert: he’s not chunky, he’s hench.

4) from E again, two nights ago, on the verge of inserting his first CGM sensor: this is one hench needle.

******

Yes, we have finally but finally ventured into CGM land. And the jury’s out so far. The sensor insertion is, I have to be honest, pretty grim. The needle is VERY hench, and scary for a slim boy with virtually nothing extra on him to fire it into. He really had to screw his courage to the sticking point. Did not want us to do it. And it was quietly a little heart-breaking to witness. Like the sil-sets, the needle goes in at 45 degrees, and like the sil-sets, the insertor sounds like a small firework being set off. Disconcerting if you’re not prepared for it. But by far the hardest thing really is the clunkiness of it all. It’s big on his stomach, with sticky tape over it, and that combined with a pump set… well, we will need to see how this goes. At the moment, it’s feeling invasive, and a little brutal, somehow. Perhaps this will pass.

We long for it to pay off, for his quality of life to be improved. It’s all worth it then, and he’ll learn to do it, exploit it, and live with it.

At the moment though, the readings are still up to 2mmols off and the hypos had in the first 24 hours weren’t picked up in the readings.

I suspect there is considerable skill to this, learning when to calibrate the machine for maximum benefit and accuracy, when not to.

For now, the best we can hope for is that in the next day or two he may be able to have a snack without testing. Or we may be able to get up in the night and look at the graph rather than wake him and poke his finger. This would start to feel like a promising path.

In another five days, there’s the prospect of the next hench needle to contend with. He doesn’t have much room on his stomach for the CGM and the pump, certainly not enough to guarantee good rotation of sites. So he’ll have to circulate the CGM elsewhere, to his leg perhaps. Which will be another leap of faith for him, and more courage. He has terrible memories of painful injecting on his legs.

Sigh. Every change and improvement in control and quality of life is preceded by a period of insecurity and SUCH hard work. And stamina, and courage. And belief. We’re in this together, but it ain’t half hard sometimes. I don’t want this for him. We don’t want this for him. Sometimes it feels like we would trade ANYTHING for him not to have to deal with this, day in and day out, morning noon and night… And when it’s like this, useless anger comes in waves: why, why why?

Sigh again. Just because.

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